All Words > Codex

Friday, August 21

Codex

[KOH-deks]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, late 16th century

1.

An ancient manuscript text in book form.

2.

An official list of medicines, chemicals, etc.

Examples of Codex in a sentence

"The library had a prize collection of ancient books, including a codex that couldn't be found anywhere else."

"The codex will serve as an inventory for the storeroom."

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About Codex

While a codex itself can be millenia old, the word comes from 16th-century Latin. It literally means "a block of wood," but it came to mean a block split into tablets for writing. Now it's used to refer to a very old manuscript, or possibly an official inventory of chemicals and medicines.

Did you Know?

Indiana Jones might treasure a codex. It's an ancient manuscript in book form, and any archaeologist would love to discover a new specimen. The Codex Sinaiticus, from the 4th century A.D., is the earliest known version of the Christian Bible.

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