All Words > Confute

Tuesday, March 29

Confute

[kən-FYOOT]

Part of speech: verb

Origin: Latin, 16th century

1.

Prove (a person or an assertion) to be wrong.

Examples of Confute in a sentence

"The student confuted the professor with a logical proof."

"After some research, I was able to confute the belief that fruit trees couldn’t grow in this climate."

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About Confute

“Confute” is derived from the Latin “confutare,” meaning “to answer conclusively.” It builds upon “refutare,” the basis of similar word “refute,” adding the prefix “con-,” meaning “altogether.”

Did you Know?

“Confute” is similar to “refute” and shares an etymological root. The difference between the two words is that “confute” has traditionally been a verb applied to proving a person or people wrong, while “refute” is applied only to proving ideas wrong. Consequently, one may refute a claim, or confute the person who made the claim.

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