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Saturday, March 7

Edacious

[ə-DAY-shəs]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, early 19th century

1.

Relating to or given to eating.

2.

Having an insatiable appetite

Examples of Edacious in a sentence

"Her priority was planning the edacious elements of the party."

"She knew her edacious uncle would eat at least twice as much as any other guest."

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About Edacious

If edacious is an adjective to describe the insatiable quality of a hunger, then edacity is the noun given to that particular desire. English language construction rules give us a few options to apply to Latin roots. A word ending in “-ious” will most likely be an adjective, and “-ity” words will be your nouns.

Did you Know?

This hungry adjective comes from the Latin word “edax” (gluttonous), coming from the verb “edere,” which means to eat. Edacious went through a similar transition, as initially it meant anything related to eating, but it evolved to specifically imply a voracious, devouring appetite.

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