All Words > Promulgate

Wednesday, November 6

Promulgate

[PROM-uhl-gate]

Part of speech: verb

Origin: Latin, early 16th century

1.

To proclaim or make an idea widely known

2.

To put into effect as a law or regulation

Examples of Promulgate in a sentence

"A side effect of social media is to quickly promulgate news and gossip."

"It may seem like nothing ever gets done in government, but the primary role of elected officials is to promulgate new laws."

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About Promulgate

There’s power in selecting the perfect word. If you want to share a doctrine or philosophy, you would promulgate. Announce implies sharing for the first time. Declare and proclaim are both forceful, confident announcements. Languish just means you’re too feeble to do anything.

Did you Know?

While the official definition has nothing to do with livestock, the origin of promulgate has ties to the milking barn. The Latin verb mulgere means to extract, or literally “to milk.” Paired with the prefix pro, meaning forward, and you’re bringing something forward when you promulgate.

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