All Words > Magistrate

Monday, March 11

Magistrate

[MAJ-ə-strait]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, 14th century

1.

A civil officer who administers the law.

2.

A judge who conducts a court that deals with minor offences and holds preliminary hearings for more serious ones.

Examples of Magistrate in a sentence

"He was surprised to be nominated as magistrate by the federal judge."

"The magistrate primarily heard bail hearings and small claims matters."

About Magistrate

Magistrate was first seen in Late Middle English, coming from the Latin word "magistratus," meaning administrator. In Ancient Rome the magistratus was one of the highest-ranking government officials. In modern governments, a magistrate is usually a judicial officer who hears lower-ranking cases.

Did you Know?

A magistrate is a judicial or civil official who is charged with administering the law. The office or position of magistrate is present in the judicial systems of the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, and India, to name a few.

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