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Panache

[pə-nash]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Middle French, 16th century

1.

Flamboyance or a confident flair

2.

A decorative plume or tuft of feathers, especially on a headdress or helmet

Examples of Panache in a sentence

"Met Gala attendees are known for their creative evening wear, which they show off with fearless panache."

"The knight's helmet was crowned with an extravagant red panache."

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About Panache

Usually reserved for events like tournaments or other occasions, a soldier's panache indicated things like his wealth, position, or family colors. The size and exuberance of a panache was a status symbol. And though usually worn only ceremonially, King Henry IV is remembered for wearing an elaborate white plume into battle as a rallying point for his troops.

Did you Know?

Panache takes flight from its Latin root in pinnaculum to mean "little wing" or, in its more vernacular form, pinna, meaning "feather."

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