All Words > Synecdoche

Friday, April 9

Synecdoche

[sə-NEK-də-kee]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Late Middle English, 1350s

1.

A figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or vice versa.

Examples of Synecdoche in a sentence

"The team’s full name is the Jacksonville Jaguars, but they are often referred to by the synecdoche, “Jaguars.”"

"The brand manager decided that the maple leaf logo could serve as a synecdoche for the tourism committee."

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About Synecdoche

While synecdoche became widely used through Late Middle English, it originated from the Greek word “sunekdokhē”— a combination of the words “sun” (together) and “ekdekhesthai” (to take up).

Did you Know?

Despite the complicated spelling of the word, synecdoche is used quite commonly. Some examples are saying America when referring to the United States, saying a statement has been put out by the company when one means a spokesperson, and referring to sports teams by their nicknames.

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